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State-and-regional
University of Illinois master plan estimated to cost $1.2B

URBANA — University of Illinois officials say a proposed $1.2 billion master plan that provides a flexible blueprint for future campus growth and development isn't unrealistic given the university's donor base and track record.

The cost is comparable to what the campus has previously spent on projects over the last 10 years, said Tim Killeen, university president. Trustee Ramon Cepeda said the cost of the master plan would be paid over 10 years.

The plan includes the $170 million renovation of State Farm Center, the $121 million renovation of Memorial Stadium, the $90 million Electrical and Computer Engineering Building, and three new residence halls estimated to cost about $75 million each, The News-Gazette reported.

"This is a feasible approach. It's very exciting," Killeen said.

Trustee Don Edwards said funding for the projects will likely have to come from fundraising.

"We should be as ambitious as possible when it comes to raising money from our alums and reinvesting it in the future of Illinois students," Edwards said.

Last month, the campus kicked off a $2.25 billion campaign as part of a $3.1 billion fundraising effort by the UI system.

"We're going to have to get very active on the fundraising for obvious reasons," Killeen said. "We can't expect all of these to be done by state funding, if it continues to erode."

Mary Jukuri, the campus planner for the consulting firm SmithGroupJJR, said a full detailed report will be available online once it's been approved by trustees. The board is scheduled to meet next week in Chicago.


Today in History

Today is Saturday, Nov. 11, the 315th day of 2017. There are 50 days left in the year. This is Veterans Day in the U.S., Remembrance Day in Canada.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Nov. 11, 1918, fighting in World War I ended as the Allies and Germany signed an armistice in the Forest of Compiegne (kohm-PYEHN'-yeh).

On this date:

In 1620, 41 Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower, anchored off Massachusetts, signed a compact calling for a "body politick."

In 1778, British redcoats, Tory rangers and Seneca Indians in central New York killed more than 40 people in the Cherry Valley Massacre.

In 1831, former slave Nat Turner, who'd led a violent insurrection, was executed in Jerusalem, Virginia.

In 1889, Washington became the 42nd state.

In 1917, Liliuokalani, Hawaii's first and only queen and its last monarch, died in Honolulu at age 79.

In 1921, the remains of an unidentified American service member were interred in a Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in a ceremony presided over by President Warren G. Harding.

In 1938, Irish-born cook Mary Mallon, who'd gained notoriety as the disease-carrying "Typhoid Mary" blamed for the deaths of three people, died on North Brother Island in New York's East River at age 69 after 23 years of mandatory quarantine.

In 1942, during World War II, Germany completed its occupation of France.

In 1966, Gemini 12 blasted off on a four-day mission with astronauts James A. Lovell and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. aboard; it was the tenth and final flight of NASA's Gemini program.

In 1972, the U.S. Army turned over its base at Long Binh to the South Vietnamese, symbolizing the end of direct U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War.

In 1987, following the failure of two Supreme Court nominations, President Ronald Reagan announced his choice of Judge Anthony M. Kennedy, who went on to win confirmation.

In 1992, the Church of England voted to ordain women as priests.

Ten years ago: President Gen. Pervez Musharraf said Pakistan would stick to its January schedule for parliamentary elections, but set no time limit on emergency rule. Marking his fifth Veterans Day since the invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush honored U.S. troops past and present at a tearful ceremony in Texas.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery and said the Sept. 11 generation had "written one of the greatest chapters" in the country's military service, toppling a dictator and battling an insurgency in Iraq, pushing back the Taliban in Afghanistan and decimating al-Qaida's leadership.

One year ago: President-elect Donald Trump shook up his transition team as he plunged into the work of setting up his administration, elevating Vice President-elect Mike Pence to head the operations. Three days after Election Day, President Barack Obama used his last Veterans Day speech to urge Americans to learn from the example of veterans as a divided nation sought to "forge unity" after the bitter 2016 campaign.

-- Associated Press