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Column | Cynthia Busch: Girls World Expo is Looking for Girls Who Mean Business

Cynthia Busch

Do you have a great business idea? The Girls World Expo on 29 April 2018 at John A Logan College is the place to show it off.

Help us discover if a girl-preneur will have the next big idea for teens and tweens.

The Girls Mean Business competition is open to all 11-to-18-year-old girls who are seeking to explore a new venture. This Southern Illinois contest is sponsored by Legence Bank. Applicants may submit their business idea either by video or in print to Girls World Expo. Finalists will be chosen and featured at the Expo on April 29, along with the winner receiving a $200 cash prize to launch her endeavor.

Women entrepreneurs can face challenges that their male counterparts do not. According to a report written by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship ("Tackling the Gender Gap: What Women Entrepreneurs Need to Thrive"), women are starting more businesses by the year.

However, their endeavors tend to not grow as quickly nor receive the same funding as male-led companies.

Sen. Shaheen's report lists "lack of role models and mentors" as the first obstacle facing female entrepreneurs.

Overcoming this challenge is a huge focus of the Girls World Expo mantra.

In a world where youth are saturated with negative media images, our impressionable females need to be inspired and empowered.

Girls want to be smart, strong and bold.

The Girls World Expo strives to give them all these things. The Southern Illinois event will be an exciting, valuable opportunity for young women of our region to meet and observe role models that have succeeded in their chosen fields.

The event is free and will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, at John A. Logan College in Carterville.

In addition to the Girls Mean Business competition, the event will be rich with examples of successful women. The speakers, presenters, vendors, activity leaders, and nonprofit advocates will be available to discuss and guide attendees toward their individual goals — while having tons of fun!

Some of these same mentors will be reviewing and evaluating the business contest submissions. To further enrich the learning experience, Legions Bank will also be hosting a workshop on how to build successful business plans. Additional sponsors will contribute to the overall professional process by providing mock practice interviews. Attendees will have the opportunity to either prepare for or spontaneously interact with experts in the field to guide their future experiences in business/job markets.

The Senate's Small Business report noted:

  • Adults with mentors are more likely to say they are planning to start a business.
  • High school girls mentored in technology are likely to choose it in college.
  • Small business owners who have access to mentoring report higher revenues and growth rates.

The young women in your community can find examples of true leadership at the Girls World Expo.

Submit your three-minute video, a written paragraph, and/or picture of your idea to: Cynthia@girlsworldexpo.com.

Please include your name, age school, and phone number.

The deadline is Wednesday, April 25.

For more information, visit girlsworldexpo.com/expos/carbondale.


National
AP
Bon Jovi reunites to enter Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

CLEVELAND — Bon Jovi reunited onstage with former members for a powerful performance celebrating its admission into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and the late icon Nina Simone was welcomed to the prestigious music club with show-stopping performances from Lauryn Hill and Andra Day.

Bon Jovi's portion of the four-hour-plus event ran an hour-long Saturday night, with Jon Boni Jovi giving a lengthy 20-minute speech onstage. He said he had been writing the speech for years.

"Some days I write the 'Thank you' speech, sometimes I write the '(Expletive) you' speech," he said. "In the end, it's all about time. It took a lot of people to get us here tonight."

Richie Sambora, who left the New Jersey band in 2013, and Alec John Such, who left in 1994, embraced their former bandmates with a hug after each one spoke onstage to accept the honor. They performed together, too, singing crowd favorites like "Livin' on a Prayer," ''You Give Love a Bad Name" and "It's My Life."

They were inducted by Howard Stern, who provided many laughs to the Public Auditorium in Cleveland, where the Rock Hall is based.

Stern joked about Rock Hall co-founder Jann Wenner, questioning why he was qualified to vote on who enters the prominent organization. Stern said the Rolling Stone magazine founder doesn't play any instruments "but he did start a great magazine ... and now it's the size of a pamphlet."

Simone, who died in 2003, was welcomed into the Rock Hall in a groundbreaking way from performers who she has deeply inspired, from Hill to Mary J. Blige.

Blige inducted Simone, calling the singer "bold, strong, feisty and fearless."

"Her voice was so distinctive and powerful and I never heard anything like it," the R&B superstar said.

Simone was a leader in pushing for civil rights and influenced everyone from Aretha Franklin to Alicia Keys. Her brother, Sam Waymon, accepted the honor on his sister's behalf.

The 33rd annual Rock Hall ceremony kicked off with a tribute to Tom Petty, who died in October at age 66. The Killers earned a loud applause from the audience when they started performing "American Girl," then transitioning to "Free Fallin'."

"Pay some rock 'n' roll respect ... to the eternal Tom Petty," frontman Brandon Flowers said, as photos of Petty were displayed in the background.

Later in the event, Ann Wilson of Heart and Jerry Cantrell honored Chris Cornell with a commanding rendition of Soundgarden's "Black Hole Sun." Cornell hanged himself in a Detroit hotel hours after a Soundgarden concert there last May.

The Cars and four first-time nominees, including Simone, Dire Straits, The Moody Blues and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, make up the 2018 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame class.

Rock Hall voters have recently opened their hearts to progressive rockers, which benefited "Nights in White Satin" singers The Moody Blues, the last act to be inducted Saturday.

Wilson of Heart said the English rockers "are and have always been a kick ass rock band."

Another English band, Dire Straits, was inducted at the event, but it was without its leader Mark Knopfler, or his brother David Knopfler. Onstage, Illsley said of Mark's absence: "I'll assure you it's a personal thing. Let's just leave it at that."

Illsley thanked the entire band and described the group as "a collective, a brotherhood." The band did not perform after speaking.

Brittany Howard, of the critically acclaimed rock act Alabama Shakes, gave an extraordinary Tharpe impression onstage, winning over the audience with her rousing live performance in honor of the godmother of rock 'n' roll. Howard was backed by Questlove of The Roots on the drums. Felicia Collins, best known has a member of the band on "Late Show with David Letterman," also wowed the audience when she performed a tribute to Tharpe.

Tharpe died in 1973 and was a pioneering guitarist who performed gospel music. A video package featuring past interviews from Johnny Cash, Aretha Franklin and others praising Tharpe's musicality aired at the event. Tharpe earned the "Award for Early Influence," while the other five acts were inducted as performers.

Flowers of the Killers, who has covered The Cars' songs at his live shows, was ecstatic and energetic as he inducted the band into the Rock Hall, even getting on his knee to hand the members their award as they walked onstage.

The Cars, founded in Boston in 1976 and known for combining New Wave and classic rock sounds, were inducted this year after being nominated twice before. Ric Ocasek paid tribute to bandmate Benjamin Orr, who died in 2000.

"It's quite strange to be here without him," Ocasek said.

The event will air May 5 on HBO.


Advice
041518-nws-today-history

Today is Sunday, April 15, the 105th day of 2018. There are 260 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On April 15, 2013, two bombs made from pressure cookers exploded at the Boston Marathon finish line, killing two women and an 8-year-old boy and injuring more than 260. Suspected bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev died in a shootout with police; his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death.

On this date:

In 1715, the Yamasee War began as members of the Yamasee tribe attacked English settlers in colonial South Carolina; the colonists were eventually able to defeat the Yamasee and their allies.

In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln died nine hours after being shot the night before by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theater in Washington; Andrew Johnson became the nation's 17th president.

In 1912, the British luxury liner RMS Titanic foundered in the North Atlantic off Newfoundland more than 2 1/2 hours after hitting an iceberg; 1,514 people died, while less than half as many survived.

In 1920, a paymaster and a guard were shot and killed during a robbery at a shoe company in South Braintree, Massachusetts; Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were accused of the crime, convicted and executed amid worldwide protests that they hadn't received a fair trial.

In 1943, the Ayn Rand novel "The Fountainhead" was first published by Bobbs-Merrill Co.

In 1945, during World War II, British and Canadian troops liberated the Nazi concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who died on April 12, was buried at the Roosevelt family home in Hyde Park, New York.

In 1959, Cuban leader Fidel Castro arrived in Washington to begin a goodwill tour of the United States. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles resigned for health reasons (he was succeeded by Christian A. Herter).

In 1960, a three-day conference to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina; the group's first chairman was Marion Barry.

In 1974, members of the Symbionese Liberation Army held up a branch of the Hibernia Bank in San Francisco; a member of the group was SLA kidnap victim Patricia Hearst, who by this time was going by the name "Tania" (Hearst later said she'd been forced to participate).

In 1986, the United States launched an air raid against Libya in response to the bombing of a discotheque in Berlin on April 5; Libya said 37 people, mostly civilians, were killed.

In 1989, 96 people died in a crush of soccer fans at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. Students in Beijing launched a series of pro-democracy protests; the demonstrations culminated in a government crackdown at Tiananmen Square.

In 1998, Pol Pot, the notorious leader of the Khmer Rouge, died at age 72, evading prosecution for the deaths of two million Cambodians.

Ten years ago: Pope Benedict XVI stepped onto U.S. soil for the first time as pontiff as he was greeted at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington by President George W. Bush, first lady Laura Bush and their daughter Jenna. Bombings blamed on al-Qaida in Iraq tore through market areas in Baghdad and outside the capital, killing nearly 60 people. Actress Hazel Court, who costarred with Boris Karloff and Vincent Price in horror movies of the 1950s and '60s, died near Lake Tahoe, California, at age 82.

Five years ago: Venezuela's electoral council quickly certified the razor-thin presidential victory of Hugo Chavez's hand-picked successor, Nicolas Maduro. North Koreans celebrated the birthday of their first leader, Kim Il Sung, by dancing in plazas and snacking on peanuts. The Denver Post won a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the movie theater massacre in Aurora, Colorado, while The New York Times captured awards for reporting on a harrowing avalanche, the rise of a new aristocracy in China and the business practices of Apple and Wal-Mart. Adam Johnson's "The Orphan Master's Son" won the Pulitzer for fiction, while Ayad Akhtar's "Disgraced" won the drama prize.

One year ago: Thousands of chanting, sign-carrying protesters took to the streets in cities across the nation, demanding that President Donald Trump release his tax returns. North Korea paraded its intercontinental ballistic missiles in a massive military display in central Pyongyang as it celebrated the 1912 birthday of the country's founder, Kim Il Sung, with his grandson, Kim Jong Un, looking on with delight. 

— Associated Press