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Crime-and-courts
Illinois courts adjusting to state's new bail reform law

QUINCY, Ill. — Courts across Illinois have had about a month to adjust to the requirements of the new bail reform law that took effect Jan. 1.

Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the Bail Reform Act in the summer that requires courts to consider a detainee's circumstances when setting conditions of release or imposing monetary bail, The Quincy Herald-Whig reported.

The law requires a lawyer to be present at the initial court appearance for anyone arrested. The law aims to release defendants without requiring they post cash bail if they don't pose a reasonable threat to the community and are unlikely to flee.

"There's a presumption for recognizance bonds," Adams County State's Attorney Gary Farha said. "There can be conditions available."

Some conditions for detainees to be released could include electronic home monitoring, curfews, drug counseling, stay-away orders and in-person reporting.

The new law could allow more people facing nonviolent misdemeanor or low-level felonies, such as theft and drug possession, to be released on recognizance bonds.

However, the law doesn't apply to those facing charges for violent crimes, sex crimes and domestic batteries.

Judge Amy Lannerd oversees bond court in Adams County.

"It challenges us to pause and review quite a bit of information," Lannerd said.

Adams County Probation Department provides a risk assessment score, which factors in whether a defendant is likely to appear in court as directed or be arrested while out on bond. The judge uses the assessment to assist in setting bond and additional conditions.

Champaign County Presiding Judge Tom Difanis said judges in his county usually set reasonable bonds at the beginning so defendants without means can be released soon after they're arrested, The (Champaign) News-Gazette reported. Difanis said the new law, "fixes problems we don't have."


Lotteries
Lotteries 0213

Illinois

Pick Three-Midday: 4-8-3

Pick Three-Evening: 0-1-5

Pick Four-Midday: 1-2-0-5

Pick Four-Evening: 1-4-0-0

Lucky Day Lotto Midday:

4-13-14-27-39

Lucky Day Lotto Evening:

7-8-17-22-43

Lotto: 4-5-8-14-26-44

Lotto jackpot: $4.25 million

Mega Millions jackpot:

$153 million

Powerball

Jackpot: $203 million

Kentucky

Pick 3-Midday: 6-1-7

Pick 4-Midday: 3-3-2-3

Pick 3-Evening: 2-1-6

Pick 4-Evening: 6-5-3-1

Missouri

Pick 3-Midday: 2-4-1

Pick 4-Midday: 4-4-1-6

Pick 3-Evening: 7-9-7

Pick 4-Evening: 0-7-7-7

ShowMeCash:

1-19-30-35-38


Advice
021318-nws-today-history

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 13, the 44th day of 2018. There are 321 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Feb. 13, 1633, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei arrived in Rome for trial before the Inquisition, accused of defending Copernican theory that the Earth revolved around the sun instead of the other way around. (Galileo was found vehemently suspect of heresy, and ended up being sentenced to a form of house arrest.)

On this date:

In 1542, the fifth wife of England's King Henry VIII, Catherine Howard, was executed for adultery.

In 1741, Andrew Bradford of Pennsylvania published the first American magazine. "The American Magazine, or A Monthly View of the Political State of the British Colonies" lasted three issues.

In 1861, Abraham Lincoln was officially declared winner of the 1860 presidential election as electors cast their ballots.

In 1914, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, also known as ASCAP, was founded in New York.

In 1933, the Warsaw Convention, governing airlines' liability for international carriage of persons, luggage and goods, went into effect.

In 1935, a jury in Flemington, New Jersey, found Bruno Richard Hauptmann guilty of first-degree murder in the kidnap-slaying of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., the 20-month-old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was later executed.)

In 1943, during World War II, the U.S. Marine Corps Women's Reserve was officially established.

In 1968, actress Mae Marsh, known mostly for her silent film work ("The Birth of a Nation"; "Intolerance"), died in Hermosa Beach, California, at age 73.

In 1974, Nobel Prize-winning Russian author Alexander Solzhenitsyn was expelled from the Soviet Union.

In 1988, the 15th Winter Olympics opened in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

In 1998, Dr. David Satcher was sworn in as the 16th Surgeon General of the United States during an Oval Office ceremony.

In 2016, Justice Antonin Scalia, the influential conservative and most provocative member of the U.S. Supreme Court, was found dead at a private residence in the Big Bend area of West Texas; he was 79.

Ten years ago: Under oath and sometimes blistering questioning, seven-time Cy Young Award winner Roger Clemens told Congress: "I have never taken steroids or HGH," while his accuser, former personal trainer Brian McNamee, sat a few feet away. Hollywood writers returned to work a day after voting to end their 100-day strike that had disrupted the TV season and canceled awards shows. Japanese movie director Kon Ichikawa died in Tokyo at age 92.

Five years ago: Beginning a long farewell to his flock, a weary Pope Benedict XVI celebrated his final public Mass as pontiff, presiding over Ash Wednesday services inside St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican.

One year ago: President Donald Trump's embattled national security adviser, Michael Flynn, resigned following reports he had misled Vice President Mike Pence and other officials about his contacts with Russia. The Senate confirmed David Shulkin to be secretary of Veterans Affairs and Steven Mnuchin to be treasury secretary. Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, died after falling ill at an airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; two women are accused of killing him by smearing a nerve agent onto his face. Actor Harrison Ford mistakenly landed his single-engine plane on a taxiway of John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California, after passing over an American Airlines jet.

 — Associated Press


Boil-orders
Du Quoin boil order lifted

DU QUOIN — The boil order in effect for all of Quillman Road and on Rod Gun Club Road from Gas Plant to Quillman has been lifted.


Local
Power outage planned for maintenance in West City

WEST CITY — Ameren will conduct a planned power outage from 11 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13, to 5 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 14.

The outage is for 131 customers and will last while Ameren workers move service to a newly installed power pole.


Local
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