Charles Burdick

Charles Burdick

My first time to hear of North Korea was in 1950 while in the United States Navy. On the 27th of June, 1950, President Truman announced he had ordered United States Air and Sea Forces to give the Korean government troops cover and support. On the same day, the United Nations Security Council voted to ask all United Nations members to help the Republic of Korea “repel the armed attack and to restore international peace and security in the area.”

Three days later, on June 30, the president authorized the use of U.S. ground troops in the fighting.

This action was brought about when members of the Security Council got word of the attack on the Republic of Korea. The border of the 38th parallel had been the scene of increasingly frequent exchanges of fire and raids.

The fighting in Korea was called a police action. Whatever it was called by our government, it was plain and simply a war. Thousands of Americans and allies were lost in this conflict. It lasted about three years, but tensions remain along the 38th parallel to this day, 64 years later.

So here we are today with North Korea heavily arming itself with nuclear and possibly hydrogen bombs, putting the United States in a highly concerned position because of the actions of North Korea’s testing of rockets that may be capable of hitting the United States. Kim Jong Un, North Korea’s leader, in my opinion, has the sense to know that it would be suicidal to attack the United States or any of our allies with such destructive weapons as nuclear or any other kind.

All this talk by a North Korean diplomat, warning that his country is ready to send, “more gift packages” to the United States is idle talk. Obviously, he is making reference to more rocket tests, which has been done in a very careless way.

Kim Jong Un had his uncle put to death because of political differences, so it is very obvious that he is a dangerous man. It has been said that mistakes can and has started wars. This is the biggest threat I see with Kim Jong Un. Misjudging the United States and a willingness to use whatever weapons necessary to protect our country would be a catastrophic mistake on his part.

I did not see action in the Korean war. Although I was in the Navy during the duration of the war, the ship I served on was sent to the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. I was in the amphibious part of the Navy, operating a landing craft. We were still considered European Occupation Forces. I was discharged n 1953 just prior to the truce with North Korea.

Only time will tell how this threat plays out with North Korea. One thing for certain, if war came with North Korea, the United States would send a “gift package” to Kim Jong Un like he has never seen before. Rest assured, the United States would be victorious and Kim Jong Un must know this.

Charles F. Burdick is a lifelong resident of Grand Tower. After graduating from high school, he joined the U.S. Navy and then went on to a 42-year Maritime career including 35 years as Master Pilot. He has been retired for 23 years and enjoys local history and writing poetry.

4
0
0
0
0

Load comments