Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Leaf through the pages of 9 nature-themed books
spotlight AP

Leaf through the pages of 9 nature-themed books

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}

The new season of spring shows has begun, and viewership is way up. But we’re not talking about screens. People are also tuning in to nature for quieter, real-life, high-stakes drama.

“Nature has been a point of solace for people over the course of the pandemic that they can tap into, either for the first time, or tap into it again,” says John Rowden, senior director of bird-friendly communities for the National Audubon Society.

Here are some books to up your knowledge of birds, bugs, plants and other life in this second pandemic spring.

0
0
0
0
0

Locations

Stay up-to-date on what's happening

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

I read these books in December, before there was a COVID-19 vaccine, before there was an end to the endless presidential election, and they were just what I needed. Lighter than my usual fare but entertaining, they were both more complex than a rom-com, less demanding than a serious novel. "The Bookshop of Second Chances" by Jackie Fraser (Ballantine, 438 pages, $17) is a pleasant story, ...

"While Justice Sleeps" by Stacey Abrams; Doubleday (384 pages, $28.95) ——— In addition to being a politician and voting rights activist, Stacey Abrams also has written eight romantic suspense novels under the name Selena Montgomery. Abrams now debuts under her own name with “While Justice Sleeps,” a straightforward legal thriller with, naturally, more than a touch of politics added to the mix. ...

"The Secret History of Home Economics" by: Danielle Dreilinger; W.W. Norton (348 pages, $27.95) ——— Danielle Dreilinger's "The Secret History of Home Economics: How Trailblazing Women Harnessed the Power of Home and Changed the Way We Live" is a fascinating history of the field and of the contributions of some very determined women. It is also a revealing account of the title's reverse: how ...

"Moon of the Snowblind," written and illustrated by Gary Kelley; Ice Cube Press (184 pages, $19.99) The history of the Indian Wars is often told from a high-altitude perspective of skirmishes, treaties, victories and defeats. This obscures what it meant to those wrapped up in its muddled battle lines and sudden, inexplicable cruelties. In this astounding graphic historical novel about the 1857 ...

Need a thrilling thriller? A timely nonfiction collection? A trip back to a literary corner of 1920s London? Here they are ... and all in paperback, too. "Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line" by Deepa Anappara (Random House, $18). The first novel from Anappara, a journalist who spent years working in Mumbai and Delhi, India, won the Edgar Award last month for best novel, presented by the Mystery ...

"Crossing the River" by Carol Smith; Abrams Press (272 pages, $26) ——— Most grief tales turn inward. The author feels compelled to figure out why he or she has joined the worst club in the world, why death has come knocking and how to survive the insanity that follows. These books are written out of emotional and existential need. Surely some purpose will grow from this tragedy. Surely it's ...

"Things We Lost to the Water" by Eric Nguyen; Alfred A. Knopf (304 pages, $26.95) ——— Eric Nguyen's moving debut novel explores the importance of stories. "Things We Lost to the Water" is about a Vietnamese family in New Orleans and the story that the mother, Huong, tells herself about how she came to arrive in the United States with her two sons and without her husband. Huong revisits the ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News