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John A. Logan Statue

John A. Logan Statue

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This statue of the general stands in tribute to one of our most influential and important native sons.

Sure, there are other statutes of Gen. John A. Logan sprinkled throughout the country. He was, after all, an instrumental figure in our nation’s history.

Murphysboro’s most famous native son and leading founder of Memorial Day led several battles and was a respected general in the Civil War.

He and his famous horse, Slasher, are memorialized at John A. Logan College by a statue carved out of four logs by Art Boatright of Marion in 2004. The 9-foot tall, 8-foot wide statue is a symbol of Logan’s legacy and his importance to Southern Illinois. There’s another statue of Logan on the campus, as well, signifying the general’s importance to the college.

Logan was at the helm of multiple clashes as a major player in the war. After it ended, he continued to leave a mark on the nation as politician. He served at both the state and federal levels, most famously advocating for an effort to have Memorial Day declared as a national holiday. Logan based the event on a remembrance ceremony at Carbondale’s Woodlawn Cemetery.

Even today, Logan continues to be lauded for his efforts.

In May, people took to the streets of Murphysboro for the Logan Centennial Celebration Parade. The parade took place from the Jackson County Courthouse to the museum that honors his name. The portrayal of Logan was alive and well as an actor rode through the parade on Slasher.

Several historic markers were also commemorated around the town square, and a town picnic took place. The community effort was just one of many showings of appreciation and respect for one of the most important leaders in Southern Illinois history.

The General John A. Logan Museum in Murphysboro features many pieces of history related to the general, including letters, photographs, portraits and maps.

Visit www.loganmuseum.org or call 684-3455 for any questions on the museum, or stop by at 1613 Edith Street.

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