Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Abortion

  • Updated

Democratic hopefuls in Wisconsin see abortion as the issue that will carry them to election wins in November, but efforts to reach Black voters on the topic are sparse. Several organizing groups said it's a complicated issue in the Black community, with a legacy of views long handed down from the more prominent and conservative denominations in the Black church. Polling data shows that abortion is a slightly more potent issue for white voters in the Democratic coalition than for Black voters. Most of the groups organizing in the Milwaukee area, a critical area for Democrats to win statewide races, are steering away from messaging solely on the issue.

  • Updated

Eli Lilly and Co. and the administration of President Joe Biden have condemned Indiana’s new ban on abortions. White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre in a statement Saturday said Indiana's Republican legislators have “put personal health care decisions in the hands of politicians rather than women and their doctors.” Lilly says it's concerned the law will hinder the company's and Indiana’s “ability to attract diverse scientific, engineering and business talent from around the world.” The law lifts the ban in cases of rape or incest and to protect the life and physical health of the mother. It takes effect Sept. 15.

  • Updated

Some South Carolina lawmakers who oppose abortion are being cautious when it comes to tightening the state's already restrictive laws even further. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June, paving the way for states to enact total bans if they choose to do so. South Carolina currently has a law banning abortion after cardiac activity is detected, at about six weeks of pregnancy. Lawmakers called a special session after the high court's decision in June to discuss the issue. But some are hesitating after seeing voters in conservative Kansas overwhelmingly reject a measure that would allow the legislature to tighten restrictions or enact a total ban.

  • Updated

Indiana has become the first state in the nation to pass new legislation restricting access to abortions since the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in June that overturned Roe v. Wade. Indiana lawmakers on Friday approved the near-total abortion ban with some exceptions, including in cases of rape, incest, and to protect the life and physical health of the mother. Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb immediately signed the bill. Indiana was among the first Republican-run state legislatures to debate tighter abortion laws after the Supreme Court ruling that removed constitutional protections for the procedure.

  • Updated

Access to abortion in Louisiana has been back-and-forth for weeks — with the state’s three clinics relying on rulings and temporary restraining orders to continue operations. Currently, Louisiana’s near total abortion ban is in effect. On Thursday, however, plaintiffs challenging the legislation filed an appeal with the state Supreme Court. If the higher court rules in their favor, enforcement of the ban will once again be blocked. The plaintiffs don’t deny the state can now ban abortion, but argue that the law’s provisions are contradictory and unconstitutionally vague.

  • Updated

The Biden administration has filed its first legal challenge to a state abortion ban since the end of Roe v. Wade with a case that could allow hospitals to keep giving women abortion-related medical care in serious medical situations. Legal experts say the Department of Justice may have a strong argument in the Idaho case filed under federal health care law, but even if they win it wouldn’t allow full access to abortion there. It could, though, give doctors more latitude to provide an abortion in an emergency or a situation that could become one.  But Texas argues federal health-care law doesn’t allow for abortion-related care banned under state law and the ultimate outcome is unclear.

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein is pushing back against Republican General Assembly leaders’ allegations that he neglected his duty to defend state law by refusing to seek enforcement of a blocked 20-week abortion ban after the fall of Roe v. Wade. Attorneys for Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore filed a brief last week asking U.S. District Judge William Osteen to lift an injunction on a 1973 state law banning nearly all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.  Stein, an abortion rights supporter, says he will continue to recuse himself from the case, drawing criticisms from Republicans who say he is refusing to do his job.

  • Updated

In deeply conservative Idaho, it's expected that abortion will be banned eventually, but abortion rights advocates are continuing their legal challenges. They were before the state's top court Wednesday to ask the justices to continue blocking enforcement of three laws intended to restrict the services. Similar legal challenges are playing out in red states across the U.S. In some of them, that's allowed clinics to continue to offer abortion services, for now at least. In the first test of voter sentiment after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision, Kansas voters on Tuesday rejected a ballot measure that would have allowed the Republican-controlled Legislature to tighten restrictions or ban the procedure outright.

  • Updated

Kansas voters have sent a resounding message about their desire to protect abortion rights by rejecting a measure that would have allowed the Republican-controlled Legislature to tighten abortion restrictions or ban the procedure outright. The vote Tuesday in a conservative state with deep ties to the anti-abortion movement was the first test of voters’ feelings about abortion since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in late June. Voters rejected a change in the Kansas Constitution to ensure that it does not grant a right to an abortion, overturning a 2019 Kansas Supreme Court decision protecting abortion rights. Opponents predicted a ban would be coming if the measure had passed.

  • Updated

President Joe Biden will sign an executive order aimed in part at making it easier for women seeking abortions to travel between states to obtain access to the procedure. One of the directives Biden will issue Wednesday will allow states that have not outlawed abortion to apply for Medicaid waivers that would help them treat women who've traveled from out of state. The order will also call on health care providers to comply with federal nondiscrimination laws and streamline the collection of key maternal health data. The order falls short of what many Democratic lawmakers and abortion advocates have demanded of Biden since the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe vs. Wade.

  • Updated

The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit that challenges Idaho’s restrictive abortion law, arguing that it conflicts with a federal law requiring doctors to provide pregnant women medically necessary treatment that could include abortion. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the suit on Tuesday. Garland said the federal government was bringing the lawsuit, which seeks to invalidate the state’s “criminal prohibition on providing abortions as applied to women suffering medical emergencies.” It's the first major action by the Justice Department challenging a state trigger law since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News