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Candidacy

Since announcing his re-election bid in July, Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker has spent nearly $7 million in advertising, a sign of what confronts the four announced prospective Republican challengers seeking to take on the billionaire incumbent in next year’s election.

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Former candidates who ran for the Democratic nomination in 2020 are now supporting Joe Biden’s candidacy. This is not unusual for former candidates, but these ex-candidates are more outwardly enthusiastic and united than in previous elections. A look at why these former candidates are more enthusiastic about this election cycle. 

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It’s looking increasingly difficult for Bernie Sanders to win the Democratic nomination, but his supporters are very loyal to his candidacy. Joe Biden will have a tough job persuading Bernie Sanders’ supporters to vote for him.  

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What’s behind Amy Klobuchar’s surge and what it means for her presidential candidacy.

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No single issue has dominated the initial Democratic primary debates more than health care, and it’s safe to assume that will be the case again Wednesday night.

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Biden continues to be the favorite of many establishment Democrats, but his underwhelming candidacy has created an opening for another pragmatic-minded Democrat to step up. That’s why former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Bloomberg are moving into the race.

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No one has more at stake this week than Biden, who faces a direct threat both from Bloomberg’s potential candidacy and Buttigieg’s rise. The former vice president cannot afford to have a lackluster debate.

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Even with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on stage, the debate over climate change took a backseat. Inslee has made the issue the heart of his campaign and he cast the issue Wednesday is the starkest terms: "The time is up. Our house is on fire."

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A: He is. The hedge-fund billionaire and impeachment impresario announced his candidacy this month, which left too little time to qualify for this month’s debate. There are still a few things money can’t buy.

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CHICAGO — A political outsider who campaigned on reforming Chicago's police department after a white officer's fatal shooting of a black teenager said Wednesday that voters likely had the high-profile case on their minds when they advanced her to an April runoff for mayor, assuring for the first time a black woman will lead the nation's third-largest city.

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