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The Biden administration has issued a long-awaited study that recommends allowing a major oil development on Alaska’s North Slope. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's recommendation is not final. It calls for up to three drilling sites initially, fewer than the five pursued by ConocoPhillips Alaska for the Willow project. Still, the agency's recommendation is angering environmentalists, who have nicknamed the proposal a “carbon bomb.” The upcoming decision on the project, which could produce 180,000 barrels of oil daily, is politically perilous for President Joe Biden, who campaigned on pledges to end new drilling on public lands.

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General Motors has conditionally agreed to invest $650 million in Lithium Americas in a deal that will give GM exclusive access to the first phase of a mine planned near the Nevada-Oregon line with the largest known source of lithium in the U.S. The equity investment the companies announced jointly Tuesday is contingent on the project clearing the final environmental and legal challenges it faces in federal court in Reno, where conservationists and tribes are suing to block it. GM said Tuesday’s announcement marks the largest-ever investment by an automaker to produce battery raw materials. The mine could support production of up to 1 million electric vehicles annually.

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A fishing community in southern Brazil has an unusual ally: wild dolphins. Accounts of people and dolphins working together to hunt fish go back millennia, from the time of the Roman Empire near what is now southern France to 19th century Queensland, Australia. But while historians have recounted the human point of view, it’s been impossible to confirm how the dolphins have benefited — or if they’ve been taken advantage of. The nets startle the fish, which break into smaller schools that are easier for dolphins to hunt. The research was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Elie Saab has whisked his guests away to Thailand for a Paris Fashion Week couture show that gleamed with gold and intricate silk embroidery. Sheer diaphanous cloth floated around the runway in Le Marais’ Carreau du Temple amid wafting perfume Wednesday, as “Emily in Paris” star Paul Forman and socialite Olivia Palermo posed nearby for the cameras. The most beautiful gowns were sometimes deceptively simple, where the sumptuous material -- like one blue satin sash rippling asymmetrically across the shoulder -- could speak for itself.

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Art has returned to a glittering Chanel universe, with monumental animal sculptures gathering in the center of the runway-in-the-round for its Paris Fashion Week couture show. This season, designer Virginie Viard collaborated again with contemporary artist Xavier Veilhan who used a bestiary in house founder Coco Chanel’s apartment as the creative springboard for the carnival-like spring decor. Yet much as the animals — in wood, paper and cardboard — appeared simplified and monochrome, the Chanel collection itself contrasted dramatically as its sparkled with color and sequins in Tuesday's unusually vibrant display.

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Dior mania descended on Paris Fashion Week menswear as over a thousand screaming fans thronged the magnificent Place de la Concorde for a glimpse of their favorite stars. The minders of the show’s VIP guests, including David Beckham, Naomi Campbell and Korean band BTS members J-Hope and Jimin, navigated the crowd like salmon swimming upstream. Inside, Dior designer Kim Jones paid homage on Friday to Yves Saint Laurent, who became the world’s youngest couturier in 1957 upon Christian Dior’s death.  The show began with remarkable filmed performances of actors Gwendoline Christie and Robert Pattinson reciting excerpts from English poet T.S.. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” spliced with images of the Dior collection.

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The warming of the waters off the East Coast has brought the loss of microscopic organisms that make up the base of the ocean’s food chain. Maine-based scientists who recently reported the results of a years-long, NASA-funded study about the subject say the increasing warmth and saltiness of the Gulf of Maine is causing a dramatic decrease in the production of phytoplankton. The tiny plant-like organisms are vital for ocean health. Potential loss of phytoplankton has emerged as a concern in recent years in other parts of the world's oceans, such as waters off Alaska.

Bergen’s old Hanseatic Quarter has a crude yet romantic charm. I crouch under creaky timbers as I wander through the Hanseatic Museum. The oversized cupboards around me once housed humble workers – each minuscule “bedroom” giving them darkness and warmth through the cold and short Nordic night. Primitive paintings of buxom maidens with come-hither smiles decorated the doors as if to bring sweet dreams to those rustic 16th-century lives.

The U.S. is a major hub for the brisk trade in which the fins of as many as 73 million sharks are cut off around the world each year.

Could trawler cams help save the world’s fish? Several companies are installing high-resolution cameras on U.S. fishing boats to replace scarce in-person observers and meet new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. 

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